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economy and you look at the industrial revolution and the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by technology which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being in a constant feedback loop to the ability to trade stock in non-of seconds. millennials or at the forefront of that. we understand that is reality so other generations are running around saying how do we adapt then how do we move? how do we go forward in this fast-paced world and millennials are taking it all in stride because that is the reality of how we grow. it's also brought us a sense of ease and adaptability. it's brought us the ability to be resilient in the economic crisis which has led to incredible youth unemployment and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see that in one year could be totally different. we saw how quickly it started and we can see how quickl
these kind of revolution that shifts fundamentals of our economy. you look at the industry evolution, the introduction of the automobile, all these changes in our society are powered by exponential technology, which changes the pace of everything from how we communicate and how fast we expect people to respond to things, to our political system and the pace of how quickly things happen and being on constant -- in a constant feedback loop. the ability to trade stocks in nanoseconds. so, millenials are at the forefront of that. we understand that as reality. so, other generations are running around saying, how do we adapt? good forward any fast-paced world. the millenials are taking it all in stride because that's the reality of how we agree up, and also brought the sense of ease and adaptability and the ability to be resilient, the economic crisis, which, wow, has led to incredible youth unemployment, and incredible debt for young people. young people are optimistic about their long-term economic future because they see in one year it could be totally different. we saw how quickly it
country at the forefront of the global economy. israelis understand the value of education and have produced 10 nobel laureates. [applause] understand the power of invention and universities educate engineers. that spirit has led to economic growth and progress. ,olar power, electric cars synthetic limbs, stem cell research that treat disease. computer technologies that change the way people around the world live. if people want to see the world of the future economy, they , home ofok at tel aviv research centers and startups. [applause] are active on social media. every day seems to be a different facebook campaign on where i should give a speech. [laughter] [applause] that innovation is as important to the relationship between the united states and israel for security. our first free trade agreement in the world was reached with israel, nearly three decades ago. twoy the trade between our countries is at $40 billion every year. [applause] more importantly, that partnership has created new products and medical treatments and pushing new frontiers of science and exploration. that is
a balanced budget and it's important we owe the country a reasonable plan and grows the economy. balancing the budget is not just a statistical exercise it's the necessary means to a healthier economy, it creates more jobs and helps people keep more of hard earned money and a contrast to the other budgets that are passing. at least budgets are passing here for a change, but all the other budgets have trillion dollar plus tax increases and have net spending increases and when he you have a trillion dollar deficit, we need to work on our spending and when the other side is offering even more spending increases and even more tax increases, more borrowing, we're still kind of worlds apart. >> greta: i went through the budget and it's very complicated, at least i think it's complicated. and i want to go to different provisions i understand. let me start with medicare. under your program it doesn't affect anyone over age 55. >> if you're born in 1958 or earlier, it doesn't affect you. meaning you stay in the current medicare program just as it's designed now. in addition we get rid of the obamac
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
-year slowdowns in the economy. we had it in 2010, 2011, 2012. everyone is on the lookout for it again. i think what the fed has been doing represents a key difference between those three years and now, because then we had stopping and starting with qe. you had end dates. so you had the market in anticipation of ending and then wondering whether they were going to pick it back up again. because this is open-ended, i think the fuel that it provides is longer lasting and represents a key difference in part of the reason why i think we'll avoid this fourth consecutive slowdown. >> heidi, the other big story of the week is cyprus, of course. cyprus a tiny company. a big banking system that is a big percentage of the gdp of that tiny country. so how does this play out? how do you think this gets resolved? and should we worry about an impact in the united states? >> well, we definitely shouldn't worry that it's going to impact the united states, because we have different rules here. what happened in cyprus is europe likes drama. it's the birthplace of opera. it has the birthplace of a lot of forms of
for a retirement crisis even as the stock market sits near highs and the economy shows improvement. host: so we're getting your take on this. your retirement andization. tell us if you are and why and if you are not, why not? it's a story in the "usa today" as well this morning confidence in retirement continues to flail about this report, because americans have to cope with many immediate financial concerns retirement is taking a backseat. only 2% of workers and a% of retirees say retirement is their most pressing issues. among other worries -- host: at least many americans have a more realistic perspective about retirement says the senior vice president of retirement and investor services at the principle financial group. host: in arkansas, a democrat, are you saving? caller: yes, i save every penny i can get my hands on. host: 401-k or how are you saving? caller: c.d.'s and bank accounts that are ensured. host: why not put it in the market? caller: i can't afford to lose it. i've seen too many people lose their behinds and with what little money i've saved all my life, i can't afford to lose
in three months and that would be the major comptroller of european all legal and economy. they would expose the company is about how the standard oe executives for supporting the nazis piece of meat headlines and lead to congressional investigations. the columnists would benefit by getting a lot of juicy items. in his letters he details how he met with landrieu pearson and he exchanged these items and bragged that he became so close to drew pearson in particular that he became regarded as one of the family. in his role as a propagandist, dahl started to make a name for himself in washington and his short stories started earning him quite a bit of a claim as a young writer and one of them and particular, sort of particularly affecting the young fable that he wrote for children and was published in the ladies' home journal was about a little gremlins that tinkered with the ref pilot planes to arouse sympathy for the british ref pilots. a particularly appealed to eleanor roosevelt who read the story to her grandchildren and in short order invited to the white house for dinner eleanor ro
live" starts right now. >> megyn: fox news alert how one country's economy is saved from the brink of collapse in an unprecedented move that experts say comes at a major cost for anyone who uses a bank. think your money is safe? welcome to "america live" everyone, i'm megyn kelly. a tiny little island nation of cyprus has decided today that it will fix its financial crisis by taking people's money. and that's the ultimate solution. they will seize 30-- no, make that 40% being of every bank account in which the person has over 100,000 euros, about 120 or 30,000. and that's your thanks for having money in the cypriot banks and now there are questions about the global cost of the rescue and people find new limits to the trust we put in banks. greg palkot live in cyprus outside the parliament there. greg? >> reporter: yeah, that's right, that's right, megyn. the folks here in cyprus are breathing a sigh of relief, their country is not going bankrupt, but the price paid could be high for the people here and around the world. and with the european union to cough up its share of the money
nation of cypress is safe for now. the last effort to bail out and save its economy, but the solution that has bank depositors and investors everywhere now nervous. the largest banks are taking up to 40% of all bank deposits more than 100,000 euros or $129,000 or higher leaving smaller deposits untouched. optimism over the deal initially pushed the s&p 500 to within a point of its all time high of 1565 in early trading. stocks told off the cypress bailout is a template for the ways in which the eurozone will address future bank problems and bailouts. the dow jones industrial average fell 64 # points, s&p down five, and the nasdaq lost ten points. on the domestic front, president obama called upon congress to, quote, finish the job on immigration. speaking during a citizenship ceremony at the white house, president obama stressed the importance of getting something done. >> we have known for years that the immigration system is broken, not doing enough to harness the ingenuity of those who work hard to find a place here in america, and after avoiding the problem for years, the time has
. let's listen. >> due to the influx and further strained the economy that is already under considerable external pressures with an unstable region, the ghoebl economy recovering. but having said that as i already alluded to, we are so grateful to the u.s. assistance in solving this enormous responsibility and together continue to appeal to international community for more help to face this calamity. i had the opportunity, obviously, to talk about the peace process and we're very delighted by the vision and depth of wisdom the president showed over the past several days with israelis and palestinians. and obviously reiterate jordan's commitment to the peace process and the crucial importance of the u.s. leadership in resuming the palestinian-israeli negotiations based on the two-state solution. there is simply no other formula, no other -- two-state solution is the only way to go and if you compare that also with the radicalization of syria, together with the peace process, this is going to be a serious threat to an already volatile region. i believe there is a window of opportunity to m
economies. its involvement in asia will be a welcomed addition. the u.s. must work with india to reduce her domestic constraints to growth and inagrees foreign direct investment. reducing red tape, increasing the supply of electricity, improving the tax system, strengthening the ability to enforce contracts will all lift india's ranking and spur business growth in a way that has been missing thus far. largelyia's economy is based on global supply chains, it is absolutely critical for india to enact reforms and liberalize its economy, to tap into this regional market. this is how india anchors itself in the asia-pacific region and we should do what we can to help leverage those reforms inside india. that is why i believe the administration must redouble its efforts to secure a u.s.india bilateral investment treaty. current negotiations are proceeding far too slowly. there are important issues to resolve and it's going to take a concerted effort to make progress, but once the b.i.t. is firmly in place, the u.s. should work with india on a free trade agreement that will foster more trade. we s
. if the economy hobbles along and don't get me wrong, the markets are roaring, we've had a few days where it has slowed just a bit. but the average american, the pedestrian middle class family how well are they doing? how confident are they? and if the economy slows for them, the prospects for immigration reform, i don't believe are nearly as high, if you don't get what mark has been saying now for over two weeks. the sequencing done right on this cut spending cuts and tax reform. things sound great and they're moving along now. but joe, as we talked about earlier, you're going to have reticent democrats. and even key congressional races who are going to slow down a bit and saying, look, i want immigration and guns dealt with, what are we doing about the economy and the budget, the debt, and tax reform? >> and this is, richard haas, you can only push people so far, i mean, not the republicans' best friend. this weekend said democrats you're about to lose me. i pay 40% federal, 15%. well, i hear we have it cued up. let's go. this is bill maher this weekend. >> -- actually do pay the freight in th
a two day meeting on the economy this afternoon. then fed chairman ben bernanke will hold a news conference. we will have live coverage of his remarks to reporters at 2:30 eastern on c-span3. here's some of what we're covering this morning. the house is expected to finish work on the republican budget of the 2014 budget. live coverage of 10:00 eastern on c-span. on c-span2, the senate is working on a measure to fund the federal government for the rest of the fiscal year. testifying about the ongoing two year civil war in syria. that live hearing starts at 9:45 eastern. this week marks the 10th anniversary of the start of the iraq war. in 45 minutes we will talk with california representative barbara lee, who opposed u.s. military action in iraq. and a congressman who served as a u.s. air force reserve chaplin, we will get his perspective on the war and veterans' issues. will, a virginia senator join us as part of our spotlight on magazine series. he writes about the role of congress in u.s. foreign policy. we will also take your calls, e- mails, and host: good morning, and welcom
out it was preplanned, prior to sequestration. anything that goes wrong in the economy, accident, tragic accident like this, paint it like sequestration. for some reason, it's the republicans' fault, somehow, trying to make the link. look to the usda, e-mails or the national park, this is cheap political props. on the back of marines pretty ticked off. >> dana: i was going to ask a media angle of this. harry reid says stuff in the past. when you say this on the floor, the media ignores it and brushes it off. whereas if it's a republican it would be -- >> greg: the definition of insanity is expecting sanity from harry reid. it's your own fault. to expect anything commonsensical from him. can we talk about how he sounds? he has the voice of horse lubery can't. can't -- lubricant. >> dana: how do you know? >> greg: it's metaphor. it spent time on the farm. doesn't he realize, he is insane. that he realizes that he is shooting in his own tent. obama owns the sequestion ration. he has become the attack dog so rabid his handlers aren't safe. we give you the job of defending harry reid.
will we see the economy take off, mr. norquist? >> guest: okay. we haven't had a trillion dollar in spending cuts what we had was an agreement by the president of the united states forced on him by the republicans to reduce spending over the next decade by a trillion dollars. so that's $100 billion a year. and those cuts haven't started happening yet. they're just beginning to kick in. the sequester is an additional $1.2 trillion over the decade. so what the republicans won in that big battle we had in 2011, the budget control act, was that obama wanted to keep spending, and he needed the debt ceiling to be increased because he'd spent so much money. and the republicans said, okay, we'll raise the debt ceiling is so the country doesn't default, but only if you agree to a dollar-for-dollar reduction in spending over the next decade. and so we got $2.5 trillion in spending restraint. not real cuts, spending less than obama had hoped in. in washington that's called a cut. if you wanted ten of something and you only got eight of something, you go i got cut too. actually, you walked a
the deficit and grow our economy. yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair lays before the house the following personal requests. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. thompson of california for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the request s granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from california, mr. bera, is recognized as 60 minutes as the designee of the minority leader. mr. bera: mr. speaker, thank you for that recognition. thank you for this time. mr. speaker, over the past several weeks, i've been talking to my constituents, i've been talking to former patients about the importance medicare and how medicare has impacted their lives, how they've relied on it. you know, as a doctor, i've taken care of thousands of patients, patients who've worked their whole life paying into a system so that they could rest easy at a time when they needed their health care. hey -- they needed their health care they wouldn't have to worry about it. this is a program that has served millions of americans for decades. they've come
, in science and research, in education. things that are important to power the economy. our focus has been on jobs first. let's get the economy in full gear. not put the brakes on it. which is what the republicans do. they've gotten austerity budget that according to the nonpartisan congressional budget office, will result in 750,000 fewer jobs bn i end of the year. so we say let's tackle the deficit in a smart way, get people back to work and reduce it over a steady period over a period of time and our comes to balance at the same time that the republicans' budget from last year comes into balance. >> on the issue of revenue, i believe your budget has about $200 billion more in revenue than senator murray's budget in the senate. why did you put that in there considering that republicans are so adverse to any new revenue? >> the budget we have in our democratic proposal. if you take it even together with the revenue from the fiscal cliff agreement, is still less total revenue, luke, than was embedded in the bipartisan simpson-bowles agreement. so we have less revenue proposed by that bipar
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: without knowing the structure of the new bedford economy, it is experiencing what a lot of people are experiencing. depending on the industries, you are a winner or loser depending on the structure of your economy. places that are strong in are growing.ces information sector, utilities. these are areas that have not been growing. host: talk about new england. aest: i grew up outside of town in massachusetts. it has similarities to new bedford. .bout 100,000 people strong industrial heritage. it redefined and re-scope itself successfully over the last couple of decades. massachusetts recognizes that its older cities have these challenges. and i go home to visit, there have been efforts to revitalize the older cities. they have lots of charms. new bedford has a wonderful whaling history. has worked atry sincetizens -- census 1997. we are looking at population changes. our other guest is lisa sturtevant with guest: richey-- where mason university she is a p deputy analysis. let's hear from bob, south dakota, rural. caller: i have some comments. [indiscernible] we should look at our
francisco. and we are making it happen for more people. we are growing our economy now. we are creating international markets for our san francisco-made products. we are strongly encouraging our neighborhoods to be clear and accessible to different cultures. and when they are, they will make things that we have never seen before. discover things we haven't had. and then we have international forums upon which to talk about it, brag about it. communicate and to exchange. whether education or to sell products and services. this makes the world even better and more closely tied. i am proud that we have the celebration that we celebrate lunar new year. and explain every year what the differences might mean with the different zodiac animals we celebrate. but in each and every one of those there is a lesson of life to see and visit and compare ourselves to and improve upon. and i would say that san francisco with the help of the people on the stage. as well as you in the audience, you are always helping to improve the city for the next generation. i look forward to 2013 being not only the min
politics a long time and the kind of performance in the recent years with the economy. everybody is frustrated. that is the good news scenario. the bad news scenario we literally fix it and we relive 2008. >> can i ask a question as conservatives especially focus on the issue of deficit and what we are going to do about it and it becomes a rallying cry. where was that rhetoric when we were involved in two wars and paying for them on a credit card and having two major tax cuts put in place? iraq war is one of the first wars we haven't had a war tax. where was that fiscal responsibility a decade ago? >> missing. and i'm the wrong person to ask this. because i said famously in budget circles. it's a big crowd. in three the party is over, people get it and not spend any more money and ten years later, i was dead wrong. we lost our rudder somewhere. that's something that america actually stuck to and lived by and served america well 200 years. since then we have developed big problems. >> i also illusion the war would pay for itself and be resolved within six months and up and running
. let me turn to this second point. the war has affected the economy as well and left us with a legacy of higher oil prices and much higher national debt to. the iraq war costs set off a chain of events that had high reaching consequences. i was speaking about budgetary costs, but there are vast costs into civil society, here and in iraq, economic costs and financial costs, and some of those costs are borne by individual society or society at byge rather than directly the government. there were many of these costs i can talk about, but let me highlight a couple. if we think back to when we invaded iraq in 2003, oil prices to order $50 a barrel. and the markets including china and india predicted those would remain in that range for the next decade. oil prices are complicated, but most agree that iraq was one of the triggers of lead to oil prices shooting up shortly after the invasion. oil prices peaked do you since then we have rarely seen oil prices below the level of $100. if jo stieglitz were here, he would argue very strongly that we need to connect the dots, that oil prices contri
democracy. it will soon be one of the world's largest economies. its involvement in asia will be a welcomed addition. the u.s. must work with india to reduce her domestic constraints to growth and increase foreign direct investment, reducing red tape, increasing the supply of electricity, improving the tax system, strengthening the ability to enforce contracts will all live in the is ranking and spur business growth in a way that has been missing thus far. since asia's economy is largely based on global supply chains, it is absolutely critical for india to enact reforms, to liberalize its economy, to tap into this regional market. this is out in the anchors itself in the asia-pacific region, and we should do what we can to help leverage those reforms inside india. that is why i believe the administration must redouble its efforts to secure a u.s.-india bilateral investment treaty. current negotiations are proceeding far too slowly. there are important issues to resolve. it's going to take a concerted effort to make progress, but once the vat is firmly in place, the u.s. should work with ind
, an international launch industry that's far from robust. now, our economy depends on the ability to create and instantly distribute vast amounts of data around the planet. space-based platforms have become a vital link in the national and global economies, and they're essential to the prediction of weather, navigation in all forms of transportation, the operation of power grids, the completion of local and global financial transactions and communication to mobile platforms whether they be on land, sea or air. commercial satellite industry also plays a critical role in supporting government operations. commercial satellites supply the majority of communications in afghanistan and iraq. today our satellites are still flying almost all of the dod's unmanned aerial vehicles, and we're providing the vast majority of the navy's communications at sea. to address the challenges that i mentioned earlier, the leading space operation, operators have gotten together on a number of complex cooperative projects, probably the most significant of these is the space data association or sda. the formation o
adviser at the time, made war with iraq make it sound like it wouldn't cause a dent in the economy. "the likely economic effects would be relatively small. if the united states goes to war in iraq to depose saddam hussein." "the key issue is oil and a regime change in iraq would facilitate an increase in world oil which would tend to lower oil prices here." there's more of this. >> oil prices went up. the number i always used to say when i talk about iraq often and paul and i would have these debates and when this was really in conscience, $20 billion on air-conditioning in iraq per year during the height of the year. $20 billion on air-conditioning in iraq and afghanistan. >> in 2002, richard pearl, chairman of the defense policy board said "we're not talking about a massive invasion along the lines of '91. we're talking about a much more modest effort in which the united states will assist iraqis in freeing their country." let me get over to paul about the manpower and loss of lives. and the world you live with. 31,000 wounded. about 600 amputees. give me a sense of your own personal e
-strapped island of cyprus is now talking about nationalizing its country's pensions to save the struggling economy there. so he they couldn't seize the bank accounts, it's under consideration, now they're going to seize your pension. and we'll see how private money keeps coming up to attempts to head off disaster and are people too quick to dismiss the notion this could happen in the united states? growing anger for veterans after this memorial that celebrates the deaths of american troops in vietnam. this is put up by the enemy, appears in a popular reality show in a way that is very celebratory. apparently they feel, the news organization apparently on the wrong side of this fight. bob beckel was one of those who is upset by the decision to use this as a prop in a television show and he will join us live to explain why he and many others think this network went way over the line. >> i am so outraged by this, cbs is idiotic, stupid and don't blame it on young producers, it had to go through somebody at the executive branch of cbs and cbs can't do better than that to have people go to a memorial w
on too long and have all do like men to my room for manage my economy? not just africa but south asia, latin america, i was in bangladesh i saw the devastating impact of the flooding of a cyclone it had put hundreds of miles of fields that the crops would not grow. i saw what adaptation means you have to have new ways to grow water involved or very dry conditions. this is expensive and difficult. of course, if you undermine people with their livelihood of food security it is a huge gender dimension. it is women primarily to have to put food on the table. that is a pattern that is so impact fall it goes on for years but we have not heard as much about it but they did not know it was caused by the carbon emissions from elsewhere so webern not talking about it but they talk about it when we went there but this was the worst human rights problem but then i read the science and realized that only of big human-rights problem but there was a foundation in ireland of climate justice that stars with injustice those that are these responsible. it is beginning to affect there is said disconnect
really matters to what is happening in europe. cyprus, 0.2% of the euro-zone economy. it's banking sector accounts for mostst economy. what is happening there has wall street's attention because of the precedent it may set for other struggling nations. also, russian business has about $19 billion in cyprus. that's according to mootiedy's. wall street happy with the plan in place right now. it's also the last week of the first quarter. check out your investments this morning. if you haven't looked in a while the you'll be pleased. the s&p 500 is up more than 9% over the first three months of 2013. you can see the rally took off from november of last year. 9% will be a solid return for the entire year. but it's happened only in the first three months of this year. the s&p 500 is up 11% over the past year overall. over and over, when is this going to end? that is nearly impossible to preticket. there is one ratio that wall street looks to and it shows that prices are still fairly valued right now, maybe even cheap at least historically speaking. look at this. this is something that measures
to bob beckel. celebrity apprentice one gets fired and china's emerging economy. they are about to over take us in 2018. ben carson will close the show. he's john hop kens neurosurgeon who may be our next president. see you soon. look what mommy is having. mommy's having a french fry. yes she is, yes she is. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. 100% vegetable juice, with three of your daily vegetable servings in every little bottle. >> good morning. it is 8 minutes before the hour. one time domestic terrorist and friends to the president bill ayers a visiting scholar at minnesota state university. school administrators are not concerned with his radical past. take note for this, you will soon be able to use your tablet and e readers during cakeoffs and landings. they will announce the new policy by the end of the year. cell phones will still not be allowed to be used during kickoff and landing. >> speaking of flying travelers beware. you can be aware you can be a prime target for scammers who want your money. courtney scott is here to let us know what we need to know. thank you
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china and its economy, and the deals it has cut in countries such as iran, pakistan, etc., you will see that probably is true. page of "thent washington times" yesterday is how china is the largest exporter of weapons. is that a direct link to what happened? guest: i think if you look at how china has positioned itself -- and they have every right to. we are the ones who i think made a strategic error. but if you look at how china has positioned itself economically to take advantage of what is coming out of all this chaos -- afghanistan as wl, pakistan as well. pakistan considers china it's number one friend. strongeru lk at the assertion in east asia of influence, you can see how china has benefited. our office was the leading proponent of what became known as the pivot to east asia while i was in the senate. i spent a lot of time in east -- and weefocused focused as much as we could on strengthening relations with japan, korea, vietnam, singapore, and changing the formula in burma and i led the first delegation into burma in 10 years or it -- in 10 years. by going into iraq the way we
, not concerned with jobs, economy and deficit and healthcare but considered with every weird social issue or recent statement by somebody they could draw out of the past and make the subject of the debate. i do think we're going to have a lot of new faces. this is healthy for our party. we're going to have one or two faces we are familiar with. i wouldn't suggest that jeb bush might not wrong. today, he might. this will be a very healthy discussion about the future course of the republican party and more importantly the future course of the country. >> greta: president is overseas. he is just on his way back. some have called it an offensive going over to israel and to jordan. is this -- as he leaves this trip, as he walks away from this trip, has this been a success? >> it's been a success he will have done things to bridge the gap between he and the israeli leadership and israeli people. that will be constructive. i think it will be good in admission of the failure of the last four years where he had a distant relationship with israel and where he tried to insist the peace process begin
economy, look at that. >> what do they do? >> they make air conditioning equipment and that's why -- and in a modular way so it can be expanded when you're in a commercial air conditioning you can add units to it along the way. >> what about ann? >> it's not one i'm looking at now. in fact, i'm looking at these banks and there is talk of them collapsing in cyprus. many are doing well like in japan. japan's banks collapsed but it was 20 years ago. nom nomoro is strong. this is one that i own and i think it should be in your portfolio. >> what about u.s. banks? do we kind of made them very whole over the last couple years. >> and they are strong, bank of america not too far off from its high. financials here or abroad, maybe cyprus but not here at home. >> we'll leave it there. and here is a story you need to know. a girl scout troop getting pranked, someone ordering 6,000 boxes of the cookies totaling 24 grand. it was a scam and the girls were left with unsold cookies. americans are coming to the rescue buying around 4,000 boxes last saturday and you can help them get the last laug
to take for cyprus' economy to recover from this? >> very good question. that's what a lot of people were really worried about whether or not what's happening there could happen in other places. >> we saw in europe seizain was saying hang on this might have longer term implications and reigned back a bit. zain, thanks so much. zain asher there. >>> secretary of state john kerry dropping in to meet with president hamid karzai. announcement coming at a time of tension as you can imagine between president karzai and coalition forces and u.s. forces in afghanistan. >> those tensions escalated this month after a bomb blast in kabul that killed nine people, kerry and president karzai just wrapping up a news conference actually. we'll update you on any developments from that. >>> also in afghanistan today another sign that u.s. involvement there is now winding down. the united states handed over full control of a prison near bagram air base to afghan authority. >> the transfer announced a year ago was supposed to take place within six months, but tensions with president karzai and concerns about
in this country, look at our economy, whether or not it's growing or whether or not it's shrinking ab how much we export to other parts of the world, a new report shows that china will overtake the united states as the world's number one economy by 2016. >> jesse: really? is that true? >> well, it's a report from the organization for economic cooperation and development. their forecast differs from other people's forecast which says basically because of china's demographics, they have a lot of people. >> jesse: a billion people, a lot of people to tax. >> alisyn: that's right. so the other prediction said it would be by the year 2020. this puts it four years earlier, by the time the president is leaving office. >> jesse: you could have on obama's watch, president obama, us being downgraded for the first time and lose the title of the number one economy in the world. that's staggering. >> clayton: to be fair to the president, this certainly didn't start under president obama, it started many years ago in china, but also, look, it's easier in china to have this kind of growth when you're doing it o
technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. witthto fight chronic.ation, rosteoarthritis pain.ses to fight chronic low back pain. to take action. to take the next step. today, you will know you did something for your pain. cymbalta can help. cymbalta is a pain reliever fda-approved to manage chronic musculoskeletal pain. one non-narcotic pill a day, every day, can help reduce this pain. tell your doctor right away if your mood worsens, you have unusual changes in mood or behavior or thoughts of suicide. anti-depressants can increase these in children, teens, and young adults. cymbalta is not for children under 18. people taking maois, linezolid or thioridazine or with uncontrolled glaucoma should not take cymbalta. taking it with nsaid pain relievers, aspirin, or bl
heard on gun control and the economy and rising income inequality so they can demand change on these urgent issues? take up the gun control thing. what can the american public, the majority of whom want an assault weapons ban, want a universal background check, et cetera, what can they do if their politicians are simply too cowardly to act on their behalf because of the power of the nra in. >> people will have to let the politicians know that they are going to be voted out in the next term. if they are not afraid of the electorate, they are never going to do these things that they need to do. we have lots of examples of when people do rise up, when people's voices are heard loudly, these politicians are just as frightened and back off, and the politicians need to be reminded that there's nearly 5 million members of the nra, and there's 303 million americans who are not members of the nra. you know, wayne says there's 100 million americans that own a gun. 200 million that don't. we are the majority. >> the majority is being outshouted and outgunned quite literally by the nrac
for the city of new york, he has done a lot on education and the economy. this is a public health issue. you're talking about 7,000 new yorkers who die a year because of tobacco products, 450,000 americans. so, look. i think this is certainly a good step but the mayor is going to have a huge fight on his hands because the tobacco industry has made it clear this is something they'll focus on and they don't back down from fights. >> it is not the only thing he is doing after. the other thing michael bloomberg wants to do is create a minimum price of 10.50 for the pack of little cigarettes and little cigars. he wants to prohibit the redeeming of any coupons for tobacco, require retailers to sell cheap cigars in packs of at least four. i think one of the larger issues out of this obviously is about the role of government in our every day lives when you talk about these kinds of things -- the banning of soda. >> yeah. >> you have to place the calorie counts in restaurants. what do you think about that? that larger issue? >> i mean, certainly in terms of being concerned about health issues and try
of the reasons is because cyprus is a tiny economy, but this would be the fourth european bailout. the fact that at the 11th hour it looks like disagreed to, it takes away an uncertainty for the market and the path of least resistance returns. and what is that path? higher. this has been been incredible year for stocks. anybody with a stock market investment has seen fantastic rushes. the s&p 500 hasn't hit a record high, a new record high yet, but it's very close now. could happen in the next couple of days. that's what the s&p looks like over the past 12 months. the s&p over the past year is up almost 12%. just this year so far, up 9%. that's the kind of return if you had a return like that, it would be the envy of all of your friends. and for anybody who is just a plain vanilla stock market investor, they've had a good run. looks like banks will probably lead higher. watch shares of blackberry. lower pre-market. >> christine romans, thanks so much. >>> ford in and advertising firm are apologizing for a recent ad that used questionable judgment. it's a cartoon showing three scantily clad
to listen to the message you have about the economy, about health care, about education. because they're so turned off by the rhetoric about illegal immigration. and that i think is what ari and the republican party is talking about now. >> so john berman has covered politics for a gazillion years. richard, you are my nonpolitico. are you moved? is there a sense of a relaunch? >> i'm the type of person that i'm to be persuaded, right some but to me, i know especially this 18 to 29 group, i just feel like it seems like marketing. and i hear the word brand and to me that makes it seem that it's not authentic. so i think social issues, but this idea of the package and -- it just seems like a branding and a marketing thing and i think a lot of young people are pretty wise to that sort of approach. >> so let's go right back then to jake. when you look at the cpac, right, and the straw poll that came out of that, you had rand paul winning with 25%, right behind was marco rubio, something like 23%. and you had contra ticker to me contradictory messages. again, polar opposites on the state of the r
definitely. >> reporter: which means this beautiful i the fate of the european and perhaps world economie nick schifrin, abc news, cyprus. >>> all right, statue of liberty which was shut down after hurricane sandy set to reopen in time for fourth of july. the statue itself survived the , bulad sits badly d. making it uoritor repairs should be compl summer trav >>> after a relentless final few weeks of winter, we are pleased to report that spring arrives. at 7:02 eastern time. just a few hours from now. as abc's ginger zee reports it's welcome news for the northeast after another major winter storm. >> reporter: it is like a broken en plows down. shovels out and that familiar sound. spring is just hours away yet nowhere in sight. >> so much for the groundhog, huh? i think he got that one wrong. >> it's ridiculous. we are tired of it. >> reporter: so is judy. >> i still have snow banks like this. it is not going away. we are all miserable. >> reporter: she had to close her bakery for the first time ever. thanks to the snow >> tims no bad. this year it is constant. >> i'm sick of
change. they sought this in the capitalist political economy of the united states and, indeed, they sought and united with those engaged in systemic change in international political economic arrangements. the black panther party fought for a domestic and a global socialist system committed to the kinds of things that everybody in here cares about; equality, justice and human rights. from where josh and i sit, this is the historical truth. fighting for revolutionary change is extremely difficult, it's often very, very messy, and the history and politics of the party confirm these particular positions. but when we go to the dominant historical narrative, the dominant popular cultural narrative that shape how many, perhaps most americans think about the party, you run into a barrage of of misinformation and misinterpretation. and it's imperative that we understand that. and as josh was sort of laying out sort of the official vilification, the official denigration and how that then folds over into the history and popular culture. so in popular understanding, for example, among a
economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. with investment information, risks, fees and expenses they're coming. yeah. british. later. sorry. ok...four words... scarecrow in the wind... a baboon... monkey? hot stew saturday!? ronny: hey jimmy, how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? jimmy: happier than paul revere with a cell phone. ronny: why not? anncr: get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com >>> the young american woman once dubbed "foxy knoxy" will find out if she will be tried for murder again. >> italy's highest court is going to announce its decision to throw out amanda knox's 2011 acquittal on charges she and her boyfriend killed her
for war. causing thisere location of the civil economy and in order to move forces rapidly to southern iraq on the border with kuwait. warning staff issued a of war. around the 24th of july we issued a warning of attack on the first of august. at that time, we still have problems competing with the broader, larger community agencies, which accepted more reassuring messages, and which went to our senior policymakers. we are in the 21st century. leopold new -- we have whole new challenges on how the expectations of intelligence and vital necessity in the information age. we a policy makers coming in who come from a different prism because they're used to using wikipedia or can look at anything they want. for us to remain relevant and possibly have to not only learn from the lessons of the past, but we have to deal and except a lot of the seven lessons that andy stated in his the seven les stated in the earlier address. again, it is a great honor to be here, to speak here, to think back 40 years. and to think about what we did right, what we did wrong, we were blessed by a great leadershi
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